Fingal Cave, the striking basaltic columns of Scotland
Wildlife

Fingal Cave, the striking basaltic columns of Scotland

Grotta di Fingal,Scozia

Fingal Cave, the striking basaltic columns of Scotland

The Fingal Cave is a marine cave located in Staffa, an uninhabited island of the inner Hebrides of Scotland. This is a spectacular geological formation connected to two other sister caves, part of the National Trust for Scotland thanks to its incredible natural acoustics. These hexagonal, basaltic pillars are formations originating from a lava flow that occurred over 60 million years ago from a solidified eruption.



The cave was recently discovered by naturalist Joseph Banks in 1772, and is formed by a very high arched ceiling with an opening of about 20 meters high and 70 meters deep, making it similar to a cathedral. This splendid natural monument is known for its extraordinary acoustics that have earned it the Gaelic name of Uaimh Bhinn, or "melodious cave". The mysterious sounds of the waves breaking on the walls of the cave have been an inspiration to many artists such as Pink Floyd, Strindberg, Felix Mendelssohn, Johannes Brahm and many others.



The best time to visit the Fingal caves and listen to its melody is from April to September, at low tide and when the waters are calmer. The entrance to the cave is forbidden throughout the year, however it is possible to arrive at the entrance of the vault on board small local ferries, disembark and walk along a natural path of steps and broken columns.



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